Office of the President, ROC (Taiwan)
   
:::
Site map中文版mobile RSS
 
|S|M|L  
*
*
:::
The President and Office of the President
*
The Presidential Office Human Rights Consultative Committee print
* Module Load Warning
One or more of the modules on this page did not load. This may be temporary. Please refresh the page (click F5 in most browsers). If the problem persists, please let the Site Administrator know.

 
 
Origin of International Review

Due to a lack of representation at the United Nations, the Republic of China (Taiwan) was unable to refer its national human rights report to be reviewed by the UN Human Rights Committee and UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. However, to strengthen the protection of our human rights, promote relevant human rights standards and align with international standards, the government decided to invite a group of international human rights experts to come to Taiwan, examine the report and then issue concluding observations – procedures fully in line with those called for by the UN. This is Taiwan’s national human rights reporting mechanism, and also serves as a platform for international human rights dialogue.

In April of 2012, our country published the Initial National Reports on the ICCPR & ICESCR. On February 25 to 27, 2013 we invited ten international human rights experts to hold the initial international review meetings for the reports in accordance with UN review procedures. The experts engaged in a constructive dialogue with representatives from government agencies and non-governmental organizations, and reviewed in detail the status of our implementation of the ICCPR & ICESCR. On March 1, the group released its 81 concluding observations and recommendations.

The review committee recognized the commitment of our government and people to comply with the relevant human rights obligations, and offered concrete recommendations for improvement where safeguards were deemed inadequate. This review model was not only innovative and unique, but also of great significance for Taiwan and the international community. For our nation’s human rights protection it was a milestone of great importance.

Taiwan's Second National Reports on the ICCPR & ICESCR were published in April 2016. In line with the aforementioned mechanism, we again invited ten human rights experts to Taiwan for the international review committee meetings for the Second National Reports from January 16 to 18, 2017. The group of experts presented 78 concluding observations and recommendations on January 20.

The international review committee pointed out that the ROC government and people demonstrated exemplary commitment in monitoring and complying with the relevant human rights obligations. The government again provided valuable and detailed reports following international precedents, and engaged in a highly constructive manner with the review committee.

top
 
 
Origin of International Review

Due to a lack of representation at the United Nations, the Republic of China (Taiwan) was unable to refer its national human rights report to be reviewed by the UN Human Rights Committee and UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. However, to strengthen the protection of our human rights, promote relevant human rights standards and align with international standards, the government decided to invite a group of international human rights experts to come to Taiwan, examine the report and then issue concluding observations – procedures fully in line with those called for by the UN. This is Taiwan’s national human rights reporting mechanism, and also serves as a platform for international human rights dialogue.

In April of 2012, our country published the Initial National Reports on the ICCPR & ICESCR. On February 25 to 27, 2013 we invited ten international human rights experts to hold the initial international review meetings for the reports in accordance with UN review procedures. The experts engaged in a constructive dialogue with representatives from government agencies and non-governmental organizations, and reviewed in detail the status of our implementation of the ICCPR & ICESCR. On March 1, the group released its 81 concluding observations and recommendations.

The review committee recognized the commitment of our government and people to comply with the relevant human rights obligations, and offered concrete recommendations for improvement where safeguards were deemed inadequate. This review model was not only innovative and unique, but also of great significance for Taiwan and the international community. For our nation’s human rights protection it was a milestone of great importance.

Taiwan's Second National Reports on the ICCPR & ICESCR were published in April 2016. In line with the aforementioned mechanism, we again invited ten human rights experts to Taiwan for the international review committee meetings for the Second National Reports from January 16 to 18, 2017. The group of experts presented 78 concluding observations and recommendations on January 20.

The international review committee pointed out that the ROC government and people demonstrated exemplary commitment in monitoring and complying with the relevant human rights obligations. The government again provided valuable and detailed reports following international precedents, and engaged in a highly constructive manner with the review committee.

top