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 Architecture

 Architecture

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Introduction
 
 

The Taipei Guest House originally served during the Japanese colonial period as the official Residence of the Governor-General, and was frequented by members of the Japanese imperial family and many political heavyweights. Even Crown Prince Hirohito stayed here on a visit to Taiwan. It is now a government property of the Republic of China (Taiwan), and is used for receiving state guests and hosting various functions.

Built from April 1899 to September 1901, the Residence of the Governor-General eventually came to be regarded as too small, and so was rebuilt in 1911. After that point, the original compound came to be known as the first-generation residence. The rebuilt version was called the second-generation residence, and is what we see today. To receive members of the Japanese imperial family visiting Taiwan, a number of renovations were subsequently implemented in later years, but never again on the scale of the renovation of 1911. After Taiwan’s retrocession, it was handed over to the Taiwan Province Administrative Official Public Ministry, which in 1947 was reorganized as the Taiwan Provincial Government. Because of its affiliation to the provincial government, the building became the residence of the Governor of Taiwan. In 1950, it came under the jurisdiction of the Office of the President and was renamed the Taipei Guest House and used as a venue to receive foreign guests and convene meetings. The Ministry of the Foreign Affairs has managed the property since 1963.

With a magnificent main structure and a Japanese garden built on the spacious grounds, the Taipei Guest House truly is a wonder to behold. One of the most valuable and best preserved architectural structures from Taiwan's early modern period, it was designated in 1998 by the Ministry of the Interior as a national historic site. Surveys were conducted afterward to collect data and compile historical records in accordance with related regulations. In 2002, a comprehensive restoration project was undertaken and was concluded in May 2006. And as a result of Taiwan’s progressing democratization, the building made its debut open house to the public in July of the same year, allowing people to at last get a first-hand look at this property that had been shrouded in mystery for a century.

 
A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn)
A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn)
A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)
A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)
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A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn) A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)

 
 
Introduction
 
 

The Taipei Guest House originally served during the Japanese colonial period as the official Residence of the Governor-General, and was frequented by members of the Japanese imperial family and many political heavyweights. Even Crown Prince Hirohito stayed here on a visit to Taiwan. It is now a government property of the Republic of China (Taiwan), and is used for receiving state guests and hosting various functions.

Built from April 1899 to September 1901, the Residence of the Governor-General eventually came to be regarded as too small, and so was rebuilt in 1911. After that point, the original compound came to be known as the first-generation residence. The rebuilt version was called the second-generation residence, and is what we see today. To receive members of the Japanese imperial family visiting Taiwan, a number of renovations were subsequently implemented in later years, but never again on the scale of the renovation of 1911. After Taiwan’s retrocession, it was handed over to the Taiwan Province Administrative Official Public Ministry, which in 1947 was reorganized as the Taiwan Provincial Government. Because of its affiliation to the provincial government, the building became the residence of the Governor of Taiwan. In 1950, it came under the jurisdiction of the Office of the President and was renamed the Taipei Guest House and used as a venue to receive foreign guests and convene meetings. The Ministry of the Foreign Affairs has managed the property since 1963.

With a magnificent main structure and a Japanese garden built on the spacious grounds, the Taipei Guest House truly is a wonder to behold. One of the most valuable and best preserved architectural structures from Taiwan's early modern period, it was designated in 1998 by the Ministry of the Interior as a national historic site. Surveys were conducted afterward to collect data and compile historical records in accordance with related regulations. In 2002, a comprehensive restoration project was undertaken and was concluded in May 2006. And as a result of Taiwan’s progressing democratization, the building made its debut open house to the public in July of the same year, allowing people to at last get a first-hand look at this property that had been shrouded in mystery for a century.

 
A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn)
A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn)
A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)
A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)
top

A panoramic view of the Taipei Guest House today (courtesy of the office of Shiue Chyn) A bird's-eye view of the Taipei Guest House during the Japanese colonial period (courtesy of the office of Huang Chun-ming)