Office of the President, ROC (Taiwan)
   
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Introduction
 

Before becoming the Presidential Office Building of the Republic of China, the building was formerly the Office of the Governor-General during the Japanese colonial period, and has thus played a significant role as the center of political power for close to a century, not just during the Japanese period, but also since Taiwan’s retrocession to the Republic of China. In 1946, after extensive work to repair the great damage caused during World War II, the building was renamed "Chieh Shou Hall" ("Chieh Shou" means "long live President Chiang Kai-shek" in Chinese) to celebrate the 60th birthday of the late president.

Although the building has been the Presidential Office Building since 1950, it was not until 2006 that its name was officially changed from the "Chieh Shou Hall" to "Presidential Office Building." This change was made to highlight the significance the building carries in constitutional government and to reflect the building’s actual use in its name. Beginning from about the 1980s, people in Taiwan started to place greater emphasis upon cultural assets conservation, leading to the passage of a number of laws and regulations in this regard. The Ministry of the Interior in July 1998 made the Presidential Office Building and its neighboring open space a national historical site, with the designation covering the area bounded by Guiyang Street, Baoqing Road, Boai Road, and Chongqing South Road.

The Presidential Office Building is a cultural asset owned by the entire people. It has witnessed the history of Taiwan. It is the place where most major policies have been decided. Since it became a national historical site, the administrators of the building have committed themselves to conserving and passing down this cultural heritage. They have conducted basic surveys and research on the building, and have been hiring professionals to undertake restoration projects to make sure that the site is properly maintained.

 
Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情)
Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情)
Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)
Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)
 
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Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情) Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)

 
 
Introduction
 

Before becoming the Presidential Office Building of the Republic of China, the building was formerly the Office of the Governor-General during the Japanese colonial period, and has thus played a significant role as the center of political power for close to a century, not just during the Japanese period, but also since Taiwan’s retrocession to the Republic of China. In 1946, after extensive work to repair the great damage caused during World War II, the building was renamed "Chieh Shou Hall" ("Chieh Shou" means "long live President Chiang Kai-shek" in Chinese) to celebrate the 60th birthday of the late president.

Although the building has been the Presidential Office Building since 1950, it was not until 2006 that its name was officially changed from the "Chieh Shou Hall" to "Presidential Office Building." This change was made to highlight the significance the building carries in constitutional government and to reflect the building’s actual use in its name. Beginning from about the 1980s, people in Taiwan started to place greater emphasis upon cultural assets conservation, leading to the passage of a number of laws and regulations in this regard. The Ministry of the Interior in July 1998 made the Presidential Office Building and its neighboring open space a national historical site, with the designation covering the area bounded by Guiyang Street, Baoqing Road, Boai Road, and Chongqing South Road.

The Presidential Office Building is a cultural asset owned by the entire people. It has witnessed the history of Taiwan. It is the place where most major policies have been decided. Since it became a national historical site, the administrators of the building have committed themselves to conserving and passing down this cultural heritage. They have conducted basic surveys and research on the building, and have been hiring professionals to undertake restoration projects to make sure that the site is properly maintained.

 
Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情)
Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情)
Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)
Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)
 
top
 

Office of the Governor-General in the Japanese colonial period (reprinted from Taiwan in 1923‧大正12年臺灣事情) Presidential Office Building today (courtesy of the Department of Special Affairs, Office of the President)